ECHR: Property right violated by Turkey in Mor Gabriel Monastery case

ECHR: Property right violated by Turkey in Mor Gabriel Monastery case
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The European Court of Human Rights ordered Turkey to pay the church foundation 12,000 euros and called for a retrial in Turkey.

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) decided that the right to property was violated by Turkey in the case concerning the ownership of a land that for centuries had been part of the property of the Mor Gabriel Monastery in Turkey's southern province of Mardin.

The monastery, founded in 397, is known to be the oldest surviving Syriac Orthodox monastery in the world.

The lawsuit was launched upon the application of the Mor Gabriel Monastery Syriac Orthodox Church Foundation in 2013, after a dispute began when Turkey redrew the boundaries of the monastery.

A 140-square-meter land in Mardin's Dargecit district, which had been owned and used for centuries by the Assyrian community, was registered to the Turkish Treasury in 2007, and the legal complaints filed by the church foundation were dismissed by Turkish courts.

The ECHR dismissed the lawsuit in May 2019 because of missing paperwork, and the decision was appealed by the church foundation.

The ECHR announced on Tuesday that the right to property was violated by Turkey in the Mor Habriel Monastery case, and ordered Turkey to pay 12,000 euros to the applicant.

The court also called for a retrial in Turkey.