The Western media analyzes Erdogan's green light for Sweden

The Western media analyzes Erdogan's green light for Sweden
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According to the Swedish media, the concessions made by Sweden to Turkey are limited, with formal cooperation against terrorism and the establishment of a special terrorist coordinator being the main points.

By Nikolaos Stelgias

Sweden's entrance into NATO is considered a historic development, as it marks a departure from its 200-year-old neutrality strategy. The Swedish media sees the deal as serving Swedish interests and offering promises to Turkey to re-energize its relations with the EU and strengthen its air force.

The Western press emphasizes the need for alternative strategies for NATO's enlargement and continued cooperation with Ukraine now that Turkey's objections have been addressed.

Overall the western newspapers and news sites analysis focuses on Sweden's historic decision to join NATO, the limited concessions made to Turkey, the timing of ratification, and the implications for EU-Turkey relations and NATO's strategies.

"SWEDEN'S CONCESSIONS TO TURKEY ARE LIMITED"

From 'Aftonbladet's perspective, Sweden's decision is historic but necessary for its security in the current context. The new development is historic, since Sweden is abandoning 200 years of non-alignment principle. The concessions made by Sweden to Turkey are limited, with formal cooperation against terrorism and the establishment of a special terrorist coordinator being the main points. The newspaper emphasizes that this is far from granting Turkey a fast track to EU membership due to Erdogan's actions against democratic institutions.

The 'Expressen' focuses on the timing of Sweden's NATO membership, highlighting the potential delay if the Turkish parliament does not ratify it before their summer recess. Like Finland's case, the former Swedish foreign minister, Jan Eliasson hopes for quick ratification. The issue of EU membership is also mentioned, with indications that the EU could approach Turkey based on discussions with European Council President Charles Michel.

The 'Dagens Nyheter' examines the deal for Sweden's entrance to NATO, highlighting closer cooperation between Sweden and Turkey in various areas. It mentions the establishment of a counter-terrorism coordinator and a commitment from Sweden to cooperate with Turkey within the EU framework. The newspaper also discusses the F-16 fighter jet deal and support for Turkey's EU membership ambitions, although the US State Department states that no new decisions have been made.

'ERDOGAN'S RESISTANCE MELTED AWAY'

The 'New York Times' views Sweden's accession to NATO as a victory for Jens Stoltenberg and President Biden. The reversal of Turkey's objections eases Biden's agenda at the summit and expands the NATO alliance, including Finland. The newspaper suggests that Erdogan's change of heart was driven by political brinkmanship and potential gains, including the possibility of acquiring F-16 fighter jets from the US.

The 'Times' mentions Erdogan's resistance melting away after a meeting with Stoltenberg and the Swedish prime minister. The reasons behind this change are not immediately clear. Still, signals from the Biden administration regarding the F-16 deal and concerns about radar technology falling into Russian hands may have played a role.

The 'Frankfurter Allgemeine' expects the Turkish parliament to approve Sweden's NATO membership, albeit with some time due to the summer recess. The newspaper also emphasizes the need for alternative strategies for NATO enlargement and cooperation with Ukraine. Germany, France, the UK, and the US negotiate a joint statement to solidify their security commitments to Kyiv.